Baxter: If Christ Died For All, Why Are Not All Saved?

“It is… proved by the sufferings of his Son, that God takes no pleasure in the death of the wicked. Would he have ransomed them from death at so dear a rate?  Would he have astonished angels and men by his condescension; would God have dwelt in the flesh, and come in the form of a servant, and have assumed humanity into one person with the Godhead?  Would Christ have lived a life of suffering, and died a cursed death for sinners, if he had rather taken pleasure in their death?  Suppose you saw him but so busy in preaching and healing of them, or so long in fasting, or all night in prayer, or praying with the drops of blood trickling from him instead of sweat, or suffering a cursed death upon the cross, and pouring out his soul as a sacrifice for our sins, – would you have thought these the signs of one that delights in the death of the wicked?

Think not to extenuate it by saying, that it was only for his elect.  For it was thy sin, and the sin of all the world, that lay upon our redeemer; and his sacrifice and satisfaction is sufficient for all, and the fruits of it are offered to one as well as to another; but it is true, that it was never the intent of his mind, to pardon and save any that would not by faith and repentance be converted.”

– Richard Baxter, The Practical Works of Richard Baxter, p. 455

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One thought on “Baxter: If Christ Died For All, Why Are Not All Saved?

  1. Publius July 26, 2015 / 2:08 am

    Think not that ‘all (pantas)’ is properly construed as the ‘totality of everything,’ i.e., all does not mean all (but ‘is’ does mean ‘is’!). To wit: “For as in Adam all die, even so in Christ shall [imperative] all be made alive.” Clearly ‘all’ DO die, but clearly ‘all’ are NOT alive, or ever will be, in Christ. All does not mean all out of context. Incidentally, neither is ‘the world’ the ‘totality of human earthly inhabitants.’ It is only by poor scholarship and weak reasoning (i.e., unspiritual) that a view such as Unlimited Atonement may be held.

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